Milk and Honey

This is Kaur’s first well known poem collection, but the second that I read. Now, it may be like the old movie vs. book debate where whichever version you experience first, you like that version best. I enjoyed this collection, don’t get me wrong, but I think The Sun and Her Flowers was just so great and that it absolutely blew me away that I don’t think anything could top it! (Even though the next collection, if she publishes another one, will become my favorite!)

Once again, her raw emotion blows me away each time I read any of her work. She is just so intimate within her poetry that you just have more empathy for her works than any other. Notice I said empathy not sympathy. She rights in ways that the reader will say to self, “wow. That’s me.”

This especially relates to writes and lovers. So many of these poems hit me hard.

To those who haven’t yet experienced Rupi Kaur’s work: you need to read one of her collections.

I Only Wanted the New Year to Start My Resolution

I wouldn’t say that this post has the longest title ever, because it’s not. But I wanted to convey my excitement for some of the books that will be released this year! Lately, while looking at publishing companies’ social media, they’ll post about a new book and I’d get all excited, only to find out I had to wait! This year, I decided I’m going to attempt to read 50 books! I know, it’s pretty lame that I haven’t ever hit it, but this is my year!

So the first book is Foolish Hearts by Emma Mills. It’s from December’s UpperCase Box, so that means it was signed and came with a whole bunch of goodies!

This book took me awhile to read because of the holidays, but I’m so glad I finished! This is a YA novel. Mills does a FANTASTIC job creating characters – seriously, I want them as my best friends. My two favorite characters are supporting ones, but the narrator is okay as well. I definitely chuckled once or twice while reading.

The story was set around a production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Mills does an excellent job paralleling the play to the storyline with out it being overly obvious, and it benefitted the main character because of her knowledge, she’s able to help out and almost force herself (in a good way!) into everyone’s life.

I don’t know if it’s just because I, personally, am awkward, but some of the social aspects were awkward! Not like Michael Scott awkward, but slightly cringeworthy.

Take some time to look into the novel! It was great!

What was your first book of 2018? What’s your reading goals?!

One of Us is Lying

As the holidays get closer and closer, my free time is dedicated to driving seven hours back home to visit family. I had to go this weekend and I have to go next weekend! Oh yes. Lots of driving. Because this book has went through travel, this poor book has been lost and coffee got spilled on it!


One of Us is Lying is a YA novel about an allergic reaction that actually turns out to be… a murder?!

It is told in four different perspectives; each of the four characters narrating are the suspects. Karen McManus sticks to the high school stereotypes: the jock, the prom queen, the “nerd”, and the burnout. The kid who dies is the kid that runs the school gossip site. It turns out that he knows all of their secrets, and as far as the cops know, that’s their motive!

The story has a lot of twists and turns and you end up trusting no one! With the constant change in narration, there’s always a cliff hanger and the end of each character’s turn.

Recommendation: If you like YA, read it. It’s pretty good! It’s a fun concept (maybe I shouldn’t use the word fun about a murder…); no, enjoyable, yeah, let’s say enjoyable.

The Noel Diary

Disclaimer: this post is going to get a little personal.

So even though I haven’t posted a million reviews on here, you can kind of pick up on the fact that my reading preferences were thrown to the wind when I bought this novel. Which, it kind of was.

You see, my mother and I aren’t talking, and she struggles with emotions. So obviously Christmas this year is going to be pretty hard. The first part of the synopsis on the novel says “Bestselling romance author Jacob Churcher hasn’t been home for almost twenty years – not since his mentally ill mother kicked him out of the house when he was sixteen.” When I read that, I picked up the novel and expected great things. Expected a quality novel? Eh. I expected this novel to give me insight and mend my relationship with my mother. But it didn’t. The only thing that is going to do that is my mother swallowing her pride.

Okay, back to the actual novel. I liked the novel on a pretty shallow level, and there were parts that I really liked. But the romance in this story was a little unnecessary. It was almost shoved into the novel like an afterthought.

The main character, Jacob, comes home to his mother’s house, basically to confront his past. While doing this he meets an old neighbor who becomes the voice of reason/wise and mysterious old lady who says some things that really throws you off and creates the curiosity within Jacob. Then this girl, Rachel, shows up at the front door and then boom. The romance starts. See? Super sudden. The novel is focused on Jacob and discovering his past, but then the Rachel comes in and she leads him to a discovery that he wouldn’t have gotten to without her.

If you couldn’t tell, I’m always super indecisive when it comes to romance novels. I’m not anti-romance; I’m almost anti-happily ever after.

I finished this novel two days ago and I’m still this wishy-washy. My apologies!

Go get lost in some pages.

Beasts of Extraordinary Circumstance

So, following up with the last post, I ended up just reading the novel on my Kindle. Oops!

This novel was Ruth Emmie Lang’s first. She did a fantastic job!

Not only did I enjoy the characters, but the format of the novel is so unique; I loved it! Though I have read several reviews not enjoying the characterization of Weylyn and feeling as though he wasn’t very personal, I agree, but I think it actually benefited the structure of the novel.

The entire novel is filled with 6 books and 4 interludes. Each book contains two narrators that switch back and forth between these characters; the books are of the past, and the interludes are breaks into what is happening in the present day. Weylyn, though the novel is about him, only narrates one chapter. The rest of the chapters and narrators and from people who have come in contact with Weylyn and how he changed the narrators’ perspective on life.

There is a tad of romance in the novel, but I would not ever characterize it as a romance novel. The romance is more like “oh I like her/him. I hope I get her/him some day.” That’s it. Bingo.

The focus of the novel is not even Weylyn, but the imprints that Weylyn leaves in these characters’ lives.

I can’t help but fall in love with the novel’s structure.

This novel is good if taken as a beach read, but it is even better of a novel if you dig into it. I am not saying it’s not enjoyable as a light read, but you get SO much more out of it if you dig in.

Until next time; now go lose yourself in some pages!

PS – here’s a great quote:

“I was guilty of agonizing now and then, of letting my uncertainty sabotage my changes at happiness. I mourned for things that hadn’t happened, things that never would.”

No Judgements, Please!

Okay, okay. Let’s get one thing straight: I will ALWAYS prefer real books… not electronic. The shuffle of pages and the smell is delightful to my senses. However, with my current job, I don’t always have time to go to Barnes & Noble, but I feel a tad empty without a book to read, so I had to improvise this morning.

As I was researching books to read, I stumbled upon Beasts of Extraordinary Circumstance by Ruth Emmie Lang; this appears to be her debut novel. I looked at her Goodreads profile and we seem to like similar things, so I think I’m going to like the novel! I was reading reviews that people had read, and they were very mixed and wishy-washy. So I had to find out for myself what this book holds.

I was able to read the first few/several pages and have come across these quotes one seems to be a theme in the novel; the other is for my pure enjoyment:

“‘What’s your name?’ he asked. ‘I love hearing what different people are called. Someday, I’d like to meet someone by every single name.'”

And this quote just makes me smile: “My wife once said she’d had a better conversation with a donkey, but she agreed to marry me, anyway, because I was a good listener and was slightly better looking.”

I will keep you updated! …and I’ll probably go and by the real life version in my free time; if that exists!

Go lose yourself in your pages!

The Sun and Her Flowers

After so many novels, I thought I’d shake it up and read some poetry – I know, guys. I live a wild life. I had heard SO MANY good things about Rupi Kaur’s work that I picked up her most recent work.

Little side note: Most of the poems I have read are the “classics,” so modern poetry before I read this was Ezra Pound and E. E. Cummings, so these poems were a huge change as to what I have read prior.

Kaur’s poetry is stark, raw, intimate, and vulnerable. Absolutely beautiful. The collection is separated into five sections, wilt, fall, root, rise, and bloom, which she includes in this poem:

This is also the poem on the back of the book, so I’m really not giving too much away! Promise!

One of the poems I really connected with was “never feel guilty for starting again”. In the past few months, I walked away from teaching, for multiple reasons, and, of course, there were the friends and family that doubted my decision. They didn’t know what else I would be able to do with and English Education degree, and, to be honest, I didn’t either. But I knew I had to walk away.

There is a reason that Rupi Kaur’s work is bestselling; she gives her readers hope, comfort, and understanding of emotions the readers themselves are not aware of.

PS. I cried during one of these poems, too.